Aging Gracefully

Kiyp Aragai - Aging Gracefully
© 2017 by Karsten Thormaehlen.

Meet Kiyo Aragai one of the 52 centenarians photographed by Karsten Thormaehlen for his new book Aging Gracefully. 

Aging Gracefully invites readers to look into the face of a century of life experience with portraits of centenarians captured by Thormaehlen’s compassionate, minimalist lens. The striking photographs are accompanied by short bios of the centenarians, featuring quotes and wisdom on love, food, humour and living with grace.

The following is an extract from Aging Gracefully.


BORN SEPTEMBER 10, 1914,IN ASAHIKAWA, HOKKAIDO, JAPAN

Kiyo Aragai

SAPPORO, HOKKAIDO, JAPAN


Kiyo says she had a free, idyllic childhood and a wonderful marriage “full of happiness and without any arguments.” She has her husband to thank for the fact that she has become such a good cook, “thanks to his wonderful sense of taste and his weakness for good food.” The couple travelled a lot, including to places abroad like Hawaii. She says she does not really have anything to complain about, nor does she have any regrets. She is at peace with herself.


Aging Gracefully, a glorious celebration of humanity and the human spirit’s capacity for happiness, is on sale 7th March 2017. Find out more and order your copy here.

Aging Gracefully by Karsten Thormaehlen

ABRAMS TO PUBLISH FIRST BOOK ON THE WOMEN’S MARCH

Why I March

For Immediate ReleaseABRAMS TO PUBLISH FIRST BOOK ON THE WOMEN’S MARCH

ALL ROYALTIES WILL BE DONATED TO NON-PROFITS AFFILIATED WITH THE MARCH

New York, New York – February 2, 2017Today,ABRAMS announced the publication of WHY I MARCH: Images from The Women’s March Around the World (Abrams Image; 21st February 2017; £11.99; Paperback), the first photographic tribute to the largest peaceful demonstration in history. The book will come out exactly one month after five million people in more than 80 countries on all seven continents stood up to challenge the dangerous rhetoric of an administration on inauguration weekend. The book takes readers on a global tour of the marches and features colourful, inspiring photographs that were provided in great part by Getty Images, which has partnered with ABRAMS.

“We are thrilled to be able to bring this book and these images so quickly to the market in order to commemorate and confirm the energy, hope, solidarity, and strength that millions of people displayed that day. Their energy and commitment has helped motivate and mobilize our own here at ABRAMS. We’re also proud to donate all of the royalties from the sale of the book to nonprofits associated with the March in support of ongoing work and resistance,” says Michael Jacobs, president and CEO of ABRAMS.

Featuring images of people in snow gear in Antarctica, women holding “Love Trumps Hate” signs in Durban, South Africa, and little girls in the streets of New York City, WHY I MARCH is organised by continent and showcases the recurring themes of inclusion and intersectionality that the March so embodied. The book also includes an in-depth Resources Guide for activists, old and new, who are looking for next steps to keep the momentum going. This includes information on existing grassroots organisations all over the United States.WHY I MARCH will honour the movement, help raise funds and awareness, and promote future activism.

About the Book:

WHY I MARCH: Images from The Women’s March Around the World

Abrams Image | 21st February 2017 | £11.99 |Paperback | 176 pages

203 x 178mm / 150 colour photographs

ISBN: 9781419728853

Books, and others.

Contact: publicity@abramsandchronicle.co.uk

Source: abramsbooks.com

Who is Phyllis Posnick?

Stoppers

 

Stoppers: Photographs from My Life at Vogue By Phyllis Posnick 

The name Phyllis Posnick is synonymous with Vogue and the extraordinary fashion editorials the magazine’s audience loves. Posnick is best known for creating photo editorials to illustrate the magazine’s Beauty and Health articles, but cast off any ideas you have about close-ups of lips and eyelashes. Instead, picture models bathed in paint or posing next to cuts of fresh meat. This collection invites readers to glimpse the complex production process—and the collaboration and creativity—behind each extraordinary editorial. The book features images by a who’s who of legendary photographers: Irving Penn, Steven Klein, Annie Leibovitz, Mario Testino, Patrick Demarchelier, Tim Walker, Anton Corbijn and Helmut Newton.

Stopper_Internal

 

The following is an extract from Stoppers: Photographs from My Life at Vogue By Phyllis Posnick 

Foreword

Whoever coined the maxim “A picture is worth 1,000 words” clearly had Phyllis Posnick in mind. For more than twenty-five years now, I’ve had the huge privilege of working with Phyllis and publishing in Vogue the fruits of her labors with Helmut Newton, Annie Leibovitz, Bruce Weber, Steven Klein, Tim Walker, Patrick Demarchelier, Mario Testino, David Sims, Anton Corbijn, and, of course, Irving Penn, or Mr. Penn, as he was known around the Vogue offices. Phyllis is more than a match for all of these consummate and renowned image-makers, who have no doubt counted themselves extremely lucky to be partnered with such a gifted and formidable collaborator. Yet there was something particularly magical about her pairing with Mr. Penn. That relationship flourished because she, like him, could distill the essence of any given story into one single and solely memorable picture, be it a portrait, a still life, or some wonderful conceptual flight of fancy. But if you have leafed through this book, pausing again and again to gaze at her incredible body of work, which is by turns majestic, intimate, and provocative, then you already know that. One has only to meet Phyllis to understand her particular brand of brilliance. Everything about her is meticulously planned, carefully considered, expertly executed. She herself is a study in rigorous taste (a personal style that borders on the ascetic) contrasted with unexpected flourishes (her passion for monumental vintage modernist Scandinavian jewelry). You could say the same of her approach to her picture-making, which she studiously—and, I’m sure she won’t mind my saying, stubbornly—pursues in the name of originality and intelligence. Nothing is ever banal with Phyllis. She could be the creative offspring of Lee Miller and Luis Buñuel: from the former, a deep commitment to photojournalism, that an image should always convey a clear and direct meaning; and, from the latter, a twisted, surreal sense of humor, with Phyllis deploying a little shock value to draw you deeper into the narrative of the picture. She has certainly never shied away from taking risks, walking the line, going that little bit further to make a sitting work. I’ve always been amused by the tale of one of Phyllis’s assistants taking a call one day from her boyfriend, who casually asked where she was. “In a sex shop, again, buying props for a shoot with Steven Klein” came her reply. In Phyllis’s time at Vogue, she has wrangled everything—flora, fauna, insects, supermodels, movie stars, athletes, and all manner of titans of the cultural and political landscape. Phyllis makes every picture she takes for Vogue an adventure, and that, let me tell you, makes coming to work every day absolutely thrilling.

 – ANNA WINTOUR

Stoppers_Internal image

Copyright © 2016 Phyllis Posnick

Peek behind the curtain of Mr. Ken Fulk’s Magical World.

Mr. Ken Fulk's Magical World

Take a peek behind the curtain of Mr. Ken Fulk’s Magical world.

Working out of The Magic Factory, a 15,000-square-foot think tank in San Francisco, Ken Fulk specialises in interior design, special events and architecture. Whether he is creating fantastic homes, throwing the opening party of a museum show, or planning large-scale events (like the famous wedding of Facebook’s Sean Parker in a redwood forest), Fulk’s work is always remarkable and stylish and sometimes over the top.

Featuring more than 200 colour photos along with short essays by the designer, Mr. Ken Fulk’s Magical World will showcase the best of his luxurious environments over the past decade: gorgeous dwellings he has designed for notable clientele; his own three homes; stunning examples of his party and event designs; and even a private jet.

Mr. Ken Fulk's Magical World Mr. Ken Fulk's Magical World Mr. Ken Fulk's Magical World Mr. Ken Fulk's Magical World Mr. Ken Fulk's Magical World Mr. Ken Fulk's Magical World

 

Mr. Ken Fulk’s Magical World is out 18/10/2016. Order yours now.

 

Abrams Books

Power to the People: The World of the Black Panthers

Power to the People

Power to the People: The World of the Black Panthers by Stephen Shames and Bobby Seale

The following is an extract from Power to the People by Stephen Shames and Bobby SealePower to the People contents page

What Was the Black Panther Party?

The Black Panther Party was a revolutionary political organisation. Although its members were leaders of the Black Power movement, they were not black nationalists. Their “black pride” was not based on denigrating whites, but on showing the black community how to take control of its own destiny. The Black Panther Party worked for economic justice and power for all people.

Bobby Seale explains, “The Black Panther Party was an ‘All Power to All the People!’ organisation. It was a powerful grassroots activist organisation that formed coalitions seeking to further our civil human rights and achieve real freedom and justice for all the people. These were the political revolutionary objectives of my Black Panther Party.”

In their landmark book, Black against Empire, Joshua Bloom and Waldo E. Martin Jr. wrote:
What is unique and historically important about the Black Panther Party is specifically its politics. . . . They created a movement with the power to challenge established social relations. . . . From 1968 through 1970, the Black Panther Party made it impossible for the U.S. government to maintain business as usual, and it helped create a far-reaching crisis for U.S. society. . . . At the center of their politics was the practice of armed self-defense against the police. . . . The Panthers’ politics of armed self-defense gave them political leverage, forcibly contesting the legitimacy of the American political regime.{2}

Many scholars have characterised the Black Panther Party as the most influential black movement organisation of the late 1960s. Professor Judson L. Jeffries has called the Panthers “the most effective black revolutionary organisation in the 20th century.”{3} Writing in the Los Angeles Times, Héctor Tobar called the organisation a “serious political and cultural force” and “a movement of intelligent, explosive dreamers.”{4}

Power to the People internal spread

 

The Legacy of the Panthers

The Panthers remain cult heroes today, a half century after their founding. They left a legacy of hope to black people in America—both youth and adults. Their courage, discipline, and dedication to serving the community continue to inspire.

Their survival programs provided a model for political action. We can thank the Panthers for shaming the federal government into action by feeding tens of thousands of children while the richest nation in the history of the world let them go hungry. The Panthers’ Free Breakfast for Children Program preceded the government’s school breakfast and lunch programs.

Many of the free medical clinics they started are still operating today. The Panthers were among the first to bring national attention to sickle-cell anemia, a disease that primarily affects black people.

The Panthers founded their own school to educate children of Panthers. Their charter school was cited as excellent by the California State Legislature and became a model in poor communities.

The Panthers’ efforts for community control of the police, including their failed referendum to establish such control in Berkeley, paved the way for community policing.

The Panthers electrified a generation of black youth. The Black Panther Party gave purpose to aimless, angry young people who loitered on street corners. The Panthers molded them into disciplined, hard workers who served their community and showed respect for their mothers, fathers, and elders in general. The Panthers provided a model for how to reach these disaffected kids. By comparison, our underfunded, piecemeal efforts to reach youth today often end in failure.

The Panthers were ahead of most of their contemporaries in regards to equality for women and gay rights. As Ericka Huggins observes:
Another thing that is part of the legacy of the Black Panther Party is that we were not afraid to look at race, class, gender, and sexual orientation. All of it. Huey wrote in support of the woman’s movement and the gay liberation movement. Who the heck—what black man, what white man, what any man was talking like that in 1970? Huey talked about it in terms that anybody could understand. We had our own gender issues, not so much sexual, but gender issues within the Black Panther Party. But, we worked that too. We really were ahead in terms of thinking and acting. {10}

The Panthers’ voter registration drives and Bobby Seale’s unsuccessful campaign for mayor in 1973 led to the election of Oakland’s first black mayor four years later. Even before that, Huey Newton’s 1968 Peace and Freedom Party campaign led to Ron Dellums’s election to Congress in 1970. Dellums finished his illustrious career in the House of Representatives as chairman, and then-ranking member (senior Democrat), on the Armed Services Committee. The number of elected African American officials at all levels nationwide in 1968 numbered in the hundreds. Today, tens of thousands of black elected and appointed officials serve our nation, including the president of the United States, the attorney general, and sheriffs in Mississippi and Alabama. Numerous former Panthers have held elected office in the United States, including Charles Barron (New York City Council, then New York State Assembly), Nelson Malloy (Winston-Salem City Council), and Bobby Rush (House of Representatives, from Illinois).

Power to the People internal spread

This Book

Bobby and I created this book with the future in mind. We believe that a look back at the role of the Black Panther Party during the turbulent 1960s will help us better understand the present, and perhaps facilitate a brighter future. This book tells the story, in pictures and words, of the heroic men and women of the Black Panther Party who tried to bring a dream of freedom and justice, both political and economic justice, not only to African Americans, but to all Americans—in fact, to all the poor and oppressed people of the world.

Power to the People is a photography book coupled with a bit of oral history from people who were there. It deals with the vision and legacy of the Black Panther Party. This book is not meant to be a comprehensive or scholarly history. Charles E. Jones, in his book The Black Panther Party Reconsidered and his essay in my first book on the party, The Black Panthers; Joshua Bloom and Waldo Martin Jr., in Black against Empire; and others have done an excellent job putting the Panthers into context.

My photographs deal with aspirations and vision. While I am not ignoring some of the negative aspects of the Black Panthers, that is not what is most important about them. To err is human, and the errors of the Panthers pale in comparison to those of the United States government at home and abroad during this period. They also are minuscule in comparison to the virulent racism and violence born out of the enslavement of millions of Africans. This racist strain continues to haunt us as we struggle toward our multiracial future. Building a wall will not keep the badness out. The bad is already here and has been since the beginning—as is all that is good about our country. We must continue to dream and organise, as the Panthers did, to ensure that the good triumphs, so we and our children enjoy a better future.

Bobby and I hope this book will be a tool to help you learn things you did not know about the Black Panther Party. The Panthers have a great deal to teach us: about their vision of community, about service, about ethnic pride and love, about coalition politics, about freedom and justice, about their Ten Point Program. We hope what you discover in this book motivates you to act.

I will leave the last word to Bobby, because he always says it best:
At this time more than ever we need activists who are motivated and dedicated to organising people, raising consciousness and instilling self-respect. . . . We especially need creative Black youth who know our history and who understand that Black Unity is the catalyst to help humanise this racist world. We need socially conscious activists who will work toward the . . . economic empowerment of our people. We need activists who cross all ethnic and religious backgrounds and colour lines who will establish civil and human rights for all. . . . We must create a world of decent human relationships where revolutionary humanism is grounded in democratic human rights for every person on earth. {13}

Power to the People internal spread

Text copyright © 2016 Stephen Shames and Bobby Seale

NOTES

{2} Joshua Bloom and Waldo E. Martin Jr., Black Against Empire: The History and Politics of the Black Panther Party
(Berkeley and Los Angeles: Universityof California Press, 2013), 9, 14, 13.

{3} Quoted in Jordan Green, “The Strange History of the Black Panthers in the Triad,” Yes! Weekly, April 11, 2006.

{4} Héctor Tobar, “‘Black Against Empire’ Tells the History of Black Panthers,” Los Angeles Times, January 24, 2013.

{10} Also see The Black Panthers, photographs by Stephen Shames, essay by Charles E. Jones (New York: Aperture, 2006), 144–45.

{13} Bobby Seale, introduction to Seize the Time: The Story of the Black Panther Party and Huey P. Newton
(Baltimore: Black Classic Press, 1991).

Beaches

Beaches by Gray Malin
Gray Malin’s beautiful new book; Beaches, has us dreaming of summer holidays lying on the beach with a book in hand. Sigh.

Dive into Malin’s awe-inspiring aerial photographs and bask in summer bliss (and maybe grab and ice-cream at lunch today!).

Beaches by Gray Malin
© 2016 Gray Malin, graymalin.com

9781419720895.IN05

Beaches
© 2016 Gray Malin, graymalin.com

 

Beaches by Gray Malin features more than twenty cities across six continents: Australia: Sydney; North America: Santa Monica, Miami, San Francisco, Kaua’i, Chicago, The Hamptons, and Cancun; South America: Rio de Janeiro; Europe: Capri, Rimini, Forte dei Marmi, Viareggio, Amalfi Coast, Barcelona, Lisbon and Saint-Tropez; Africa: Cape Town; Asia: Dubai.

The book is available now from any good bookstore and online. Buy your copy on our website.

For Love.

Sometimes when I turn on the news it feels like there is no good left in the world. And then I open For Love: 25 Heartwarming Celebrations of Humanity by Alice Yoo & Eugene Kim of My Modern Met and my faith in humankind is restored.

For a little #WednesdayWisdom come Mid-week pick-me-up we have the story of A Husband In a Pink Tutu to share with you*.

*we dare you not to well-up.

A husband in a pink tutu

In 2003, Linda Carey was diagnosed with breast cancer. Stricken by the news, her photographer husband Bob Carey dedicated his photo series The Tutu Project to cheering her up.

The photographs feature Bob wearing nothing but a pink tutu in humorous situations like frolicking in the snow, lying in the center of Times Square, or standing among rows of corn in the middle of a field. The visual story was shared around the world as millions of viewers were touched by Bob’s act of love. The couple received thousands of e-mails, and though it’s hard to narrow down which one touched them the most, Linda remembers one in particular: “An eleven-year-old girl thanked us for making her mother smile as she went through chemotherapy. My heart was touched, and tears were flowing.”

Some say laughter is the best medicine, and this project is evidence that Bob and Linda have really embraced that motto. As Bob says, “Oddly enough, cancer has taught us that life is good; dealing with it can be hard, and sometimes the very best thing—no, the only thing—we can do to face another day is to laugh at ourselves, and share a laugh with others.”

Linda’s cancer reoccurred in 2006, and she has been fighting the disease ever since. The Careys have dedicated Bob’s photography to raising money for breast cancer research.

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© Bob Carey Photography
www.bobcarey.com
Bob_Carey_For_Love
© Bob Carey Photography
www.bobcarey.com
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© Bob Carey Photography
www.bobcarey.com
Bob_Carey_For_Love
© Bob Carey Photography
www.bobcarey.com
Bob_Carey_For_Love
© Bob Carey Photography
www.bobcarey.com
Bob_Carey_For_Love
© Bob Carey Photography
www.bobcarey.com

 

For Love is a collection of highly creative and incredibly moving visual stories from 25 contemporary photographers has been thoughtfully curated by Alice Yoo and Eugene Kim, founders of the leading art and culture blog My Modern Met. These photo essays capture magnificent displays of ordinary people-parents and children, husbands and wives, grandparents, friends, siblings, and pet owners-doing extraordinary things for love. From Batkid’s mission to save San Francisco, to the husband who wore a pink tutu all over the country to bring his sick wife joy, to a collection of portraits of people “happy at 100″, these heartwarming photographs will inspire boundless faith in humanity.

For Love

Glasgow

Glasgow

In 1980 Raymond Depardon fulfills an order for the Sunday Times Magazine, but the reportage will never be published.

The pictures will wait in the photographer’s boxes until the exhibition Un moment si doux (Such a sweet moment) at the Grand Palais (14th November 2013 – 10th February 2014), where the audience discovers a sample of the Glasgow series and goes into raptures about it. Depardon grasps the light of Scotland as never before and sublimes the end of a working world.

Little Red Riding Hood

Glasgow’s cloudy skies and soaked ground give an extraordinary beauty to the wanderings of working people, hanging around in front of the shops, walking towards the factories’ walls and even playing about ruined houses.

Man reeling and green bus

In Glasgow the reportage has been reproduced in full creating an evocative glimpse at a past world. Depardon captured both the harsh realities of life for some, but also children playing happily and widespread evidence of a community spirit undimmed by tough circumstances.

Depardon’s extraordinary pictures are also being used as part of a new exhibition at the Barbican, opening Wednesday 16th March.

Live Colourfully

Live Colourfully.

We don’t know about you, but we are completely obsessed with instagram and aspire to fill our account with warm and colourful pictures. So when this beautiful book; Lartigue: Life In Color, landed at A&CB towers we couldn’t wait to share it. Filled with colour photographs by Jacques Henri Lartique it has us brimming with inspiration.

Lartigue: Life in Color

Jacques Henri Lartigue (1894–1986) was the best-known “amateur” in the history of photography, famously discovered by the art world and given an exhibition at MoMA in New York when he was in his late sixties. He began by recording the pastimes and customs of his wealthy Parisian milieu, indulging his fascination with sports and aviation, and throughout his long life he was never without his camera. His friendships extended to the superstars of French culture, but he also made thousands of photographs of his family, wives and lovers. His work was irresistibly warm and engaging.

Open Book, Lartigue
Photograph by Jacques Henri Lartigue © Ministère de la Culture – France / AAJHL

 

Although best known for his black-and-white work, Lartigue loved colour film, experimenting with the Autochrome process in the teens and twenties and embracing Ektachrome in the late 1940s. His colour work, reproduced here for the first time, is astonishingly fresh: the French countryside, the women in his life, famous friends and glimpses from his travels all come alive in this delightful book.

Open Book, Lartigue
Photograph by Jacques Henri Lartigue © Ministère de la Culture – France / AAJHL

 

This divine book has us dreaming of hopping on the Eurostar and filling our Instagram with colour!

Lartigue, open book
Photograph by Jacques Henri Lartigue © Ministère de la Culture – France / AAJHL

 

Finding Home

The story of 35 rescue dogs finding home. 

Finding Home

 

Finding Home, by Traer Scott, is an elegant tribute to man’s best-friend and simultaneously a emotional portrait of shelter dogs. Candid pictures and profiles on thirty-five dogs make this book an eloquent plea for the adoption and welfare of our furry companions.

Meet Molly, Nanook and Flynn.

Finding Home - Flynn
Image © 2015 Traer Scott

Flynn, is a large, playful young pit bull/lab mix. He was found as a stray and, like most young energetic dogs struggled with shelter life. Despite daily walks with volunteers and playtime outside, he became hyperactive and anxious in his kennel. Thankfully it only took two months for him to be adopted.

Finding Home_Nanook
Image © 2015 Traer Scott

Nanook, named by shelter staff after the dog in the 1978 film The Lost Boys, is a brindle pit bull mix. He was found as a stray playing in a parking lot. He was untrained and badly behaved, but after several months of “boot camp” staff saw a softer side to him and he was adopted into a wonderful home.

Finding Home_Molly
Image © 2015 Traer Scott

Molly, a super-affectionate senior golden retriever was separated from her owner of ten years after she was forced to move into a retirement home that did not allow pets. Molly was in the shelter for two week, before being adopted by a man with disabilities and his family.

Do you have a rescue pet?

Share their story with us on twitter; @abramschronicle ‪#‎FindingHome‬